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Have We Been Approaching Weight Loss All Wrong?

It’s frustrating for me and I’m sure for them too really if you want to know the truth of it. I bet I get asked this question daily by either someone in person, through email or text, or on one of the many social media channels out there with regard to their diet. It just shows us again that a lot of us in this community have been approaching weight loss all wrong.

The question I get asked more than any other is “What diet should I do? Paleo? Keto? Whole30? Primal? Atkins?” and the list goes on and on.

The truth, that you as a reader of this blog already know but these folks obviously don’t, is that each of these diets are just takes on a new spin on a different approach.

That approach?

Elimination

Yep, that’s right it’s as simple as that. There is no rocket science to any of them.

They either eliminate specific foods as is the case with say the Whole30 diet which calls for elimination of a very specific set of foods. Typically touted as a “challenge” and done at gyms this diet looks eerily familiar to the 4R or 5R protocol that the doctors at the ME clinic and naturopaths all over the world have been providing to patients for years.

Or maybe entire food groups as you will find with the Atkins diet and carbohydrates in the form of starch. This diet has been vilified and returned as a winner due to high saturated fat which caused heart disease in the 80’s and 90’s but through the miracle of research now it does not…

Even the tried and true Mediterranean diet comes with some elimination of salt from foods. This one comes highly recommended by most western medicine doctors, especially if you’ve got high blood pressure, heart issues, or a history of well… life.

Keto is all the rage right now in the dietary world, but probably more useful for Alzheimers, but it’s just a limitation of carbs (and maybe some protein) in favor of fat. Side note: If they renamed this one the Bacon and Cheese diet I think it would sell better. :0)

Oh, and by the way most of these diets come with an assortment of foods that are branded conveniently enough under the same name.

I should also note that Metabolic Effect’s first book, The New ME Diet, was titled as a diet book. But if you read it you really won’t find any elimination other than bites of carbohydrates.

I could go on ad nauseam about this

But the point I always make to the initial query is this.

It doesn’t matter which one I think you should do.

If you aren’t doing a diet now then pretty much any diet will work for a certain amount of time and that’s probably about 2 weeks less than you’ll stick with it.

When you stop seeing results what are you going to do?

“Paleo” harder?

Or maybe some new diet program catches your eye or whatever. #squirrel

I would then ask said person why they want to do a diet in the first place?

Why not instead try creating a lifestyle for yourself around the inconvenient reality that all types of food will always be around? Doesn’t that seem a bit more sustainable?

  • Be able to know about YOUR body and to be able to learn to become a detective of your metabolism.
  • Consistently see results while knowing what triggers you and what buffers you from overeating.
  • Be able to be confronted with food that may not be ideal but still eat for fat loss.
  • Know that your metabolism will change with your life and how best to deal with lifestyle factors that are unique to you.
  • Create your own diet that can be adjusted like a thermostat and not someone’s off the shelf plan which is more like a calculator.

Now I’m probably preaching to the choir here and you’re all just sitting there saying “Yeah, that’s right!” But if any of this sounds foreign to you I would highly encourage you to check out the online program we put together called the Metabolic Effect Diet program.

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